Trumpet

Fanzine published by Tom Reamy with ten issues from 1965 to 1969. An eleventh issue was published in 1974, and a twelfth issue was published by Ken Keller in 1981 after Reamy died in 1977. The 12th issue featured letters written to Keller and Reamy's fanzine Nickelodeon, and was intended to be a continuation of that fanzine as well. Most of the material in issue 12 had been intended for Nickelodeon 3, according to Keller in the editorial. Trumpet was a slickly produced, professionally printed fanzine (the last several issues had color covers) in an era where the much less expensive ditto or mimeograph reproduction was typical. It often included art folios by current and historical artists, and was the publication site for Reamy and George Barr's adaptation of Poul Anderson's The Broken Sword, which was never completed.

In 1966 Trumpet received enough nominations for Best Fanzine to appear on the Hugo final ballot, but was ruled ineligible because it had not published enough issues to qualify. (Nomination requires a minimum of four issues with at least one in the past year; Trumpet had not yet published four issues.) It was nominated for the 1967 Best Fanzine Hugo and the 1969 Best Fanzine Hugo, but did not win.

Some highlights of various issues:

Issue 4 (April 1966) has the first eight pages of The Broken Sword; columns by Jerry Pournelle and andrew j. offutt; film reviews by Reamy; fanzine reviews by Alex Eisenstein; and articles on John W. Campbell by Tom Perry, Edgar Rice Burroughs by John McGeehan, Doctor Who by Alan Dodd, and horror films by Dan Bates. Illustrators include Dan Adkins, George Barr, Al Jones, and uncredited others.

Issue 9 has a full color cover by Hannes Bok, an article on Bok by Emil Petaja and a folio and poetry by Bok. There are 3 articles on 2001 A Space Odyssey by Harlan Ellison, Richard Hodgkins and Alex Eisenstein; David Gerrold's "The Awful Offal" on Star Trek fandom; Peter Singleton's "Purple Hearts" on his confinement for schizophrenia and drugs; columns by offutt and Dan Bates; and fiction by Dave Hickey on Superman.

Issue 10 has a full color cover by George Barr, and features Larry Niven's revisioning of his Known Space series "Down in Flames."

Issue 11 has a full-color cover by Stephen Fabian; a reprint of Harlan Ellison's "'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman" with a new introductory piece, "Stealing Tomorrow"; art folios by Fabian and Robert Kline; fiction by W. G. Bliss and Al Jackson; and articles by Ken Nahigian, Steven Utley and Ruth Berman.

Issue 12 has a yellow, silver and blue foil cover by Ned Dameron, a Reamy article on Star Wars, reminiscences of Reamy by Howard Waldrop and Algis Budrys, illustrated verse by Jim Fitzpatrick, articles by Richard Hodgens and Grant Carrington, and fiction by Ronald Anthony Cross. There is also an article with portfolio on the work of Franklin Booth, and illustrations by Bill Rotsler, Jim Steranko, John Severin, Grant Canfield, and others.

Issue Date Pages Notes
1 February 1965 40
2 June 1965 40
3 December 1965 56
4 April 1966 52
5 April 1967 44
6 June 1967 44
7 May 1968 44
8 1968
9 1969 52
10 1969 52
11 1974 36
12 Summer 1981 52

This is a Stub Fanzine page. Please extend it by adding information about when and by whom it was published, how many issues it has had, (including adding a partial or complete checklist), its contents (including perhaps a ToC listing), its size and repro method, regular columnists, its impact on fandom, or by adding scans or links to scans.