Shacktivity Requirements

Most apas allow married couples to share a single membership: One set of dues and one mailing is all they pay and get, respectively, but if both maintain full regular activity requirements, they usually each get to vote in the egoboo poll (if any) and in the election of officers. Some of the social changes that are generally associated with the 1960s actually got started in the late 1950s–and Charles Burbee, who was then an official of FAPA, addressed one of them by pointing out that some fan couples were choosing to live together and try things out for a while rather than getting married only to discover that they were really incompatible. Not to put too fine a point on it, Burbee said, they were “shacking up.” Burbee ruled that these couples could have a dual membership in FAPA, just like a married couple, provided only that they met "shacktivity requirements," i.e., proved to him that they did the same things together that married couples do.

Contributors: Dr. Gafia