Quasi-Quotemarks

(1)

Quasi-quotemarks or quasiquotes, quotation marks with hyphens underneath, "like this," indicate a paraphrase rather than a direct quote. The concept was introduced by Jack Speer in the 1940s, and stayed in use until typewriters gave way to word processors, which made it difficult to achieve, as with the use of virgules for semi-cancellations.

On a typer, it was done by backspacing to add the hyphen; in the modern computer age, quasiquotes can be created without much trouble using strikethrough coding, but few fanwriters still employ them.

(2)

QuasiQuote was a fanzine published by Sandra Bond until 2009.

The last issue can be found at http://efanzines.com/Quasiquote

Issue Date Pages Notes
7 2008
8 March 2009 36
from Fancyclopedia 2 ca. 1959
(Speer) It frequently is impossible or inconvenient to quote a speaker's exact words, and not vital to do so. In such a case, you may merely give the substance of what he said; and in place of quotation marks, use quote-marks with a hyphen under each, "like this", instead of qualifying the quotation with a clumsy phrase like "or words to that effect". Such quasi-quotes indicate that you will be answerable for the substantial meaning and implications of the quotation but do not have the exact wording available or have altered the original construction and wording to fit conveniently into your sentence structure. Example: "But, 'Every intensely active fan I know is some kind of disgusting character' says Miske." "He said he "had just been too busy"." (In the first example Miske's actual wording was, "I know of no fan who ranks as 'intensely active' who is not some sort of disgusting character." In the second, original "have" is changed to "had".) Your K. Breul has been unable to trace the rumored connection between Speer's introduction of the "in fandom and Fletcher Pratt's use of the European quotemark, the three-em dash, for the same purpose in his historical works.
from Fancyclopedia 1 ca. 1944
(Speer) - It frequently is impossible or inconvenient to quote and exact works of a speaker or writer, and not important to do so. In such case, you may merely give the substance of what he said, and in place of quotation makes, use quote-marks with a hyphen under each "like this" instead of qualifying the quotation with a clumsy phrase like "or words to that effect". Such quasi-quotemarks indicate that you will be answerable for the substantial meaning and implications of the quotation, but either do not have the exact wording available, or have rearranged the construction and wording of the original statement to fit conveniently into your sentence structure. Examples: "but, 'Every intensely active fan I know of is some kind of disgusting character', says Miske." "He said he 'had just been too busy"." (In the first example, Miske's wording was, "I know of no fan who ranks as 'intensely active' who is not some sort of disgusting character." In the second, "have" in the original has been changed to "had").


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