Mailing
from Fancyclopedia 2 ca. 1959
The bundle mailed at definite intervals by an Amateur Press Association, containing the magazines sent in during the previous chronon for distribution to the membership. In the APAs publication produced by the individual members at their own expense (for the fun of it, and for exchanges) are sent to the person designated as mailing manager (Official Editor or Association Editor, in fandom) who on a designated date sends a copy of each, with the official organ he puts out, to every member; postage is paid by the treasury. This constitutes the "mailing"; it is capitalized when referring to a particular one, like the August Mailing or the Eighty-Eighth Mailing. For purposes of tabulation, postmailings are regarded as part of the mailing they follow chronologically.

In fan APAs it is required that publications to be distributed with the mailing represent "to a substantial extent" the work of a member, that sufficient copies for all members be provided, and that they be duplicated by some means giving "identical" copies.
from Fancyclopedia 1 ca. 1944
Capitalized when referring to a particular one, as the September Mailing or the Fifteenth Mailing. The First Mailing of the FAPA was in the fall of 1937, so that ordinals divisible by 4 indicate a June mailing. The deadlines are the first Saturday in September, December, March, and June; when possible the envelopes are sent out on these dates, but if they are delayed for some other reason, post-deadlines stuff is included. Post-mailings are officially considered as part of the Mailing whose deadline they come after.

Sometimes small publications have been sent out as bonuses or as conveniences to the authors, with regular subscription fanzines. In the APAs, publications are sent to the person designated as mailing manager (in the FAPA, the official editor), who at regular intervals sends a copy of each with the official organ in a large envelope or bundle to each member, postage paid by the treasury. In any case, the publications themselves are produced at the expense of the individual publishers for the fun of it and for exchanges. In the FAPA it is required that the publications represent to a substantial extent the work of a member, that sufficient copies be supplied to cover the entire membership, and that they be duplicated by some means giving "identical" copies, tho we have at times afflicted with some utterly illegible copies.