Hyphen

Hyphen is a fanzine, successor to Slant, published between 1952 and 1965 by Walt Willis and Chuck Harris. Ian McAulay became co-editor with issue 25, and Madeleine Willis also acted as co-editor.

Hyphen was more fannish and less sercon than Slant and is widely regarded as being one of the greatest fanzines ever published.

A final issue being published in 1987 after a hiatus of 22 years to celebrate forty years if Irish Fandom. It was nominated for the 1954 Best Fanzine Retro Hugo.

A checklist and a number of issues can be found at http://www.fanac.org/fanzines/Hyphen/. Issue 37 can be found at http://efanzines.com/Hyphen

Issue Date Pages Notes
1 May 1952 16
2 September 1952 20
3 February 1953 28
4 October 1953 28
5 November 1953 22
6 January 1954 26
7 March 1954 28
8 April 1954 30
9 July 1954 44
10 September 1954 34
11 November 1954 34
12 December 1954 52
13 March 1955 42
14 June 1955 42
15 November 1955 40
16 August 1956 30
17 December 1956 42
18 May 1957 40
19 January 1958 26
20 February 1958 26
21 October 1958 42
22 March 1959 26
23 November 1959 24
24 March 1960 24
25 November 1960 26
26 January 1961 24
27 March 1961 26
28 May 1961 26
29 September 1961 26
30 December 1961 24
31 March 1962 26
32 March 1963 28
33 June 1963 24
34 September 1963 24
35 April 1964 24
36 February 1965 22
37 Autumn 1987 62

This is a Stub Fanzine page. Please extend it by adding information about when and by whom it was published, how many issues it has had, (including adding a partial or complete checklist), its contents (including perhaps a ToC listing), its size and repro method, regular columnists, its impact on fandom, or by adding scans or links to scans.

from Fancyclopedia 2 ca. 1959
(Madeleine Willis) "A fanzine", defines Chuck Harris laconically, "First issue May 1952". It was co-edited by Walt Willis and Harris, but was really more or less the product of the group known as the Oblique Angles. It became a focal point for a lot of people on the fringe of fandom as well as within it, succeeding Quandry as Zeitgeistsprecher of the old Sixth Fandomites who opposed 7th Fandom during the Sixth Transition. It influenced Anglofandom (and US Fandom) muchly by its amiably irreverent attitude toward fandom and stf in general — the "Serious Constructive Insurgentism" of Walt Willis' which found its most perfect, if not most typical, expression in The Harp Stateside and such other works as Through Darkest Ireland and The Enchanted Duplicator. "Neither Walt nor I cared for the name when Madeleine coined it," Chuck explains, "but now we think it's about perfect and wouldn't change it for anything."